In

Mathematics and Culture

Professor Chris Matthews, Chair Of The Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Mathematics Alliance (ATSIMA) And University Of Technology, Sydney

Speaker

Professor Chris Matthews

Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Mathematics Alliance (ATSIMA) And University Of Technology, Sydney

Professor Chris Matthews is from the Quandamooka people of Minjerribah (Stradbroke Island) in Queensland Australia. Chris received a PhD in applied mathematics from Griffith University and was a Senior Lecturer in applied mathematics at the Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University. Over the last ten years, Chris developed a deeper interest in mathematics education for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learners and exploring the connections between mathematics and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledges. Chris is currently the Chair of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mathematics Alliance (ATSIMA) that aims to transform mathematics education for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learners. Chris is also the Associate Dean (Indigenous Leadership and Engagement) in the Science Faculty at University Technology of Sydney (UTS). As part of this role, Chris will be leading a team of academics to transform the Science curriculum to meet the Indigenous Graduate Attribute and develop a Community of Indigenous STEM professionals at UTS.

Schedule

DATETIMEPRESENTERVENUEREGISTER
Wednesday, 18 January6PM AEDTProf. Chris MatthewsThe University of Melbourne and OnlineRegister Now

 

Talk abstract

This presentation will explore the idea of teaching mathematics from a cultural perspective particularly in relation to Indigenous learners. This approach relies on the premise that mathematics is a cultural practice and there are many different cultural expressions of mathematics. To explore this approach, Professor Chris Matthews will introduce the Goompi model and how it can be used to create different pedagogical approaches to the teaching and learning of mathematics. He will show examples from the classroom from this approach that 1) allowed students to create their cultural expressions of certain mathematical concepts and 2) allowed Indigenous educators and students to explore the connection between their culture and mathematical concepts. From these examples, Professor Matthews will argue that this approach creates a deeper understanding of mathematics and connects the students to the teaching and learning of mathematics.